Tips to Maximize Your Referral “Hit Rate” and Earn More Referral Commissions

Tips to Maximize Your Referral “Hit Rate” and Earn More Referral Commissions

Referral Commissions

Have you visited the “Invite and Earn” tab in your Maven profile recently? At Maven, we believe that our best resource for growth are the knowledgeable professionals that exist already within our community — so we provide you with the opportunity to earn Referral Commissions for inviting other great people to join Maven. We say this a lot, but it bears repeating: anytime someone you introduced to Maven interacts with one of our customers during the first year of their participation, we will give you a bonus equal to 10% of whatever they make! This is not drawn from your friend’s earnings, but rather commission paid directly by Maven to thank you for helping us grow intelligently.

We have worked with thousands of Members to help them “Invite and Earn,” and we’d like to share a few tips and best practices to help you make your recruiting efforts as fruitful as possible.

    • Relationships Matter – Your experience will be much more rewarding if you introduce your personal and professional contacts to Maven; right away, you will be able to interact with people you know well and whose knowledge and expertise is valuable to you. Be thoughtful about who you invite. Avoid inviting a list of everyone you’ve ever met and blindly blasting away. If you do, many of the people on your list may not remember meeting you and might not appreciate your unsolicited message. While we encourage you to spread the word about Maven, thoughtful, targeted invitations are much more likely to be received favorably and help you to earn referral commissions. Consider your contacts and who is truly an expert in their field or trade before extending them your invitation.
    • A Little Cleanup Goes a Long Way – If you are uploading a large list or importing your contacts from LinkedIn or other websites, take some time to clean it up before sending. Personal contact lists frequently include notes about the person (i.e. nicknames, professional certifications, degrees, etc), or are written quickly in lower case or all capital letters. Be mindful that whatever is listed in the First Name field will be included in your invitation (Dear “First Name”). Moreover, on professional networking sites like LinkedIn, people occasionally include more in their titles than just their name (“Open Networker,” “Marketing Guru,” etc). Rather than sending messages to “John Social Media Champion” and “Dave Open Networker,” do a quick scan and fix these formatting artifacts. This will help make your message more effective and convince John and Dave to pay close attention to your invitation and join Maven.
    • Get Personal – At the bottom of the invitation page we provide space to include a personal message with your invite. The default message we include (“Come check out Maven. I think you would make a great addition to the Maven community.”) gets the point across well enough, but it isn’t really your “voice,” is it? You’ve already made the effort to think about some good people to invite and do some cleanup of your contacts list, so take 30 more seconds to write a couple sentences of your own explaining to your invitees why you think they should join Maven. A well-written custom message goes a long way in making bulk invites appear personalized. Think about what initially made you excited about Maven and share why you chose this group to invite. Here are some examples we have seen:
      • “Maven is growing at an explosive rate and I want to be the first one to bring it to your attention…”
      • “I just got paid $300 to help explain web analytics to a Maven client…”
      • “I have used Maven to speak with a number of network security professionals, and I thought you would be the kind of person other Maven customers would like to speak with…”
    • Avoid Double Vision – Do you have more than one email address? Have you ever received exactly the same message from the same person on two different email accounts at the same time? Annoying, isn’t it? Well, the same thing can happen to the people you invite to Maven if you’re not careful. Check to make sure you didn’t import more than one email address for the same person. Our system checks to prevent duplicate invitations being sent to the same email address, but there is no reliable way to check by name. If you have multiple email addresses for a person, select whichever one you think is most appropriate and leave the other one off.
    • Timing isn’t Everything… but it Sure Counts for Something  – When are you more responsive to email… at 8am on Tuesday or at 4pm on Friday? Perhaps not surprisingly, we find that sending invitations to join Maven before noon in the sender’s local time zone earlier in the week (Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays) yields a higher acceptance rate than those sent later in the day or week. Does this mean you shouldn’t send invitations on Saturday afternoon? No, of course not — every invite has a chance of success, no matter when it is sent. But, generally speaking, the best time to send invitations is before noon early in the work week.
    • Big List? Let Us Help – We recognize that there are highly connected people out there who can invite thousands, even tens of thousands of very qualified people to join Maven. If you’re one of these well-connected Mavens, contact us for assistance and we would be happy to help you with your invitations. We will help you to “scrub” your list, craft an effective personalized message, and manage the invitation process for you to ensure the best possible results.

Follow these tips to maximize the effectiveness of your invitations, and improve your chances of earning Referral Commissions from Maven.

By | 2017-09-05T01:48:10+00:00 March 5th, 2015|Maven News & Updates, Tips & Tricks, Uncategorized|0 Comments

About the Author:

Ellen is an Associate at Maven. She has a diverse background in public relations spanning the consumer technology, high technology, luxury lifestyle, and travel industries. Outside of the office, Ellen is an avid runner, rower, and hiker.

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